guide-to-surviving-your-website-redesignI’m back after a lengthy hiatus from writing this blog. The main reason I didn’t write is because my website was being redesigned since last February. If I continued to write posts past the last ones I composed, I wouldn’t be able to transfer them to this new blog platform. The website redesign was a lot of hard work. In today’s post. I thought I would share some practical advice as a guide to surviving your website redesign.

Guide to Surviving Your Website Redesign

Some reasons to get a website redesign:

  1. Your web technology is outdated and you want technology that is current. Maybe your site is not responsive as was the case with mine. People on mobile devices couldn’t view it and I was losing lots of potential leads.
  2. Competitors in your industry have redesigned their websites to be more user-friendly. I was seeing lots of websites that were one page. The viewer could just scroll down to capture all of the important information. In today’s busy world, viewers don’t want to search through a site to find information. They don’t have the time. You need to have all of the important information in one spot.
  3. Your business focus has changed. You are now offering new services and products or have a new niche client who won’t relate to your current site.
  4. Your website design is just like everyone else’s. You ‘d like to make your site look more professional, more attention-getting, and more concise.

Steps to take to help your website developer complete your website redesign:

1.  Start reviewing other websites in your industry.

When I finally determined to move forward with the website redesign, I started collecting website addresses of sites that I really liked.  I stored them in a content management system called Evernote.

2. Plan out the content and the arrangement of your text so it has a logical flow. 

I thought long and hard  about the information I needed to convey to viewers if I ever expected to get any work. I wanted to start the site with a question to entice people to read more and to understand the purpose of the site.

Next came my promise to clients who would hire me  – my mission statement or commitment to them.

Subsequently, I listed  my three main services to help readers quickly learn what marketing solutions I had to offer them.  By clicking on each respective service, they could receive more details about it.

Now, I needed a section to introduce myself so viewers would get to know, like, and trust me.  I tried to make the tone of the writing light – not too serious. Humor is the universal language – everybody understands it; I decided to incorporate some into my bio. I wanted to appear friendly and approachable, yet skilled to take on a client’s  projects.

I also wanted people to quickly see what my clients were saying about me so I decided to have some of my testimonials interspersed throughout  my front page. Likewise, I decided to include some quotes from famous entrepreneurs to coincide with each section of the website page.

I wrote the content and sent it to my website developer with the website addresses I had collected. I also sent him some IStock photos to use for each section of the front page. We also decided to include a section on my presentations with a background photo doing an actual seminar.

3. Make sure you have a way to collect readers’ email addresses.

Finally, came the blog section and the subscribe box to capture email addresses of those who wanted to read my blog articles. Make sure that your subscribe buttons are noticeable.

4. Don’t forget about keywords.

I was also concerned about ranking for several keywords related to my services.  My website developer received a list of those as well.  He also retained some of the pages from my former website as landing pages even though they don’t show on my current website.  That was brilliant because I didn’t lose my ranking on page one of Google for the keywords on these pages.

5. Design is important to entice visitors to stay on your site.

When it came to the actual graphic design of the website, since I had reviewed so many, I finally decided on a white background with some parts having the texture of wrinkled paper and wood . My website designer suggested including a pencil or two because I do so much writing for clients. I wanted some splashes of color so we used the purple and gold from my logo for branding purposes. I also found a blue to evoke trust from the readers and to appeal to male visitors.

6. Ensure you have a way to analyze how many visitors you are getting and how they found your site. 

My website developer installed my Google Webmaster tools and Google Analytics so I can see which pages are being accessed ,how long people are staying on certain pages, where they are coming from, and other pertinent information. This will inform you if your marketing strategies are working.

7.  Ensure that your site is responsive.

I told my website developer that I wanted a responsive design since so many people are using mobile devices to access the Internet. I didn’t want to lose any of the visitors to my website because they couldn’t clearly see it.

If you follow some of the steps I took to get a finished product, you will survive your website redesign. Just imagine yourself as a visitor to your site. Why did you come to this site? What information do you need to make an educated decision to hire the professional whose site you are visiting.

Have you survived a website redesign? What process did you use to accomplish it? Leave a comment and let us know.

If you need assistance with the content for your website redesign, contact us at 904-553-0366. We now provide remote online content writing, and social media marketing services, in addition to the creation of  marketing plans. Our service area includes the United States and Canada.